Where Words and Pictures Party

Are You Talking To Me?

Added on by Timothy O'Briant.

I'm trying to be more aware of my audience with my comics.  I made a concious decision to leave a ray gun in my 24 hour comic to the kids.  Another teacher that shared the comic with her class was worried too, but I tried to head off any problems early by calling it a nice ray fairly early on, and later describing it as a bubble blower.  Not that I think guns in fiction is a problem, I grew up on G.I. Joe and have shot exactly zero people to date.  It was something I had to think about when dealing with a young audience in our p.c. centric culture.  My early labels were far more concerned with satiating parents, and not the kids.

So how did the kids take it?  The story was for them after all.  They were all very impressed with my artwork and the fact that I could show it on our smartboard.  It's pretty easy to wow six year olds with your art, although I always get asked why the books aren't in color.  When we start working on the all ages book Maps, we will need to focus on a bright, exciting palette.  The most amusing comment was from a little girl who called me out on putting "Mickey Mouse feet" on one of the bugs.

With that being said, I'm beginning to wonder who the audience is for 3rd World.  Public Education is squarely aimed at teachers, and I have a lot of contact with them.  Maps will be aimed at young kids and I know how to get those books into the right hands as well.  Where do I find fans of self published fantasty epics?  It's a pretty specific niche, and not one I feel I have very much access to.  Of course, I'll need to solve my printing problems before marketing is a real issue, but the question still stands.  Who is 3rd World for?  I enjoy it, and that counts for a lot, but it'd be nice to have a clear vision of who else might find the books entertaining.

- Jon O